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Specificity of the initial collapse in the folding of the cold shock protein

Title data

Magg, Christine ; Kubelka, Jan ; Holtermann, Georg ; Haas, Elisha ; Schmid, Franz X.:
Specificity of the initial collapse in the folding of the cold shock protein.
In: Journal of Molecular Biology. Vol. 360 (28 July 2006) Issue 5 . - pp. 1067-1080.
ISSN 0022-2836
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2006.05.073

Official URL: Volltext

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Abstract in another language

The two-state folding reaction of the cold shock protein from Bacillus caldolyticus (Bc-Csp) is preceded by a rapid chain collapse. A fast shortening of intra-protein distances was revealed by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements with protein variants that carried individual pairs of donor and acceptor chromophores at various positions along the polypeptide chain. Here we investigated the specificity of this rapid compaction. Energy transfer experiments that probed the stretching of strand beta2 and the close approach between the strands beta1 and beta2 revealed that the beta1-beta2 hairpin is barely formed in the collapsed form, although it is native-like in the folding transition state of Bc-Csp. The time course of the collapse could not be resolved by pressure or temperature jump experiments, indicating that the collapsed and extended forms are not separated by an energy barrier. The co-solute (NH4)2SO4 stabilizes both native Bc-Csp and the collapsed form, which suggests that the large hydrated SO4(2-) ions are excluded from the surface of the collapsed form in a similar fashion as they are excluded from folded Bc-Csp. Ethylene glycol increases the stability of proteins because it is excluded preferentially from the backbone, which is accessible in the unfolded state. The collapsed form of Bc-Csp resembles the unfolded form in its interaction with ethylene glycol, suggesting that in the collapsed form the backbone is still accessible to water and small molecules. Our results thus rule out that the collapsed form is a folding intermediate with native-like chain topology. It is better described as a mixture of compact conformations that belong to the unfolded state ensemble. However, some of its structural elements are reminiscent of the native protein.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: PubMed-ID: 16815441
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Chemistry > Former Professors > Professorship Biochemistry - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Franz Xaver Schmid
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Chemistry
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Chemistry > Professorship Biochemistry
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Chemistry > Former Professors
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 540 Chemistry
Date Deposited: 24 Apr 2015 08:05
Last Modified: 28 May 2015 15:34
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/10643