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The role of salt and shear on the storage and assembly of spider silk proteins

Title data

Eisoldt, Lukas ; Hardy, John G. ; Heim, Markus ; Scheibel, Thomas:
The role of salt and shear on the storage and assembly of spider silk proteins.
In: Journal of Structural Biology. Vol. 170 (January 2010) Issue 2 . - pp. 413-419.
ISSN 1047-8477
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsb.2009.12.027

Abstract in another language

Major ampullate silk fibers of orb web-weaving spiders have impressive mechanical properties due to the fact that the underlying proteins partially fold into helical/amorphous structures, yielding relatively elastic matrices that are toughened by anisotropic nanoparticulate inclusions (formed from stacks of beta-sheets of the same proteins). In vivo the transition from soluble protein to solid fibers involves a combination of chemical and mechanical stimuli (such as ion exchange, extraction of water and shear forces). Here we elucidate the effects of such stimuli on the in vitro aggregation of engineered and recombinantly produced major ampullate silk-like proteins (focusing on structure-function relationships with respect to their primary structures), and discuss their relevance to the storage and assembly of spider silk proteins in vivo.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Institutions of the University: Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science > Chair Biomaterials
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science > Chair Biomaterials > Chair Biomaterials - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Advanced Materials
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Molecular Biosciences
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Polymer and Colloid Science
Profile Fields > Emerging Fields > Food and Health Sciences
Profile Fields
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields
Profile Fields > Emerging Fields
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 600 Technology, medicine, applied sciences
600 Technology, medicine, applied sciences > 620 Engineering
Date Deposited: 22 Sep 2015 11:38
Last Modified: 26 Nov 2015 10:51
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/19481