Titlebar

Export bibliographic data
Literature by the same author
plus on the publication server
plus at Google Scholar

 

Decomposition of 13C-labelled standard plant material in a latitudinal transect of European coniferous forests: Differential impact of climate on the decomposition of soil organic matter compartments

Title data

Coûteaux, Marie-Madeleine ; Bottner, Pierre ; Anderson, Jonathan M. ; Berg, Björn ; Bolger, Thomas ; Casals, Pere ; Romanya, Joan ; Thiery, Jean M. ; Vallejo, V. Ramon:
Decomposition of 13C-labelled standard plant material in a latitudinal transect of European coniferous forests: Differential impact of climate on the decomposition of soil organic matter compartments.
In: Biogeochemistry. Vol. 54 (2001) Issue 2 . - pp. 147-170.
ISSN 1573-515X
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010613524551

Abstract in another language

13C labelled plant material was incubated in situ over 2 to 3 years in 8 conifer forestsoils located on acid and limestone parent material along a north-south climatic transect fromboreal to dry Mediterranean regions in western Europe. The objectives of the experiment wereto evaluate the effects of climate and the soil environment on decomposition and soil organicmatter dynamics. Changes in climate were simulated using a north-to-south cascade procedureinvolving the relocation of labelled soil columns to the next warmer site along the transect.Double exponential, decay-rate functions (for labile and recalcitrant SOM compartments)vs time showed that the thermosensitivity of microbial processes depended on the latitude fromwhich the soil was translocated. Cumulative response functions for air temperature, and forcombined temperature and moisture were used as independent variables in first order kineticmodels fitted to the decomposition data. In the situations where climatic response functionsexplained most of the variations in decomposition rates when the soils were translocated, theclimate optimised decomposition rates for the local and the translocated soil should be similar.Differences between these two rates indicated that there was either no single climatic responsefunction for one or both compartments, and/or other edaphic factors influenced the translocationeffect. The most northern boreal soil showed a high thermosensitivity for recalcitrantorganic matter compartment, whereas the labile fraction was less sensitive to climate changesfor soils from more southern locations. Hence there was no single climatic function whichdescribe the decay rates for all compartments. At the end of the incubation period it was foundthat the heat sum to achieve the same carbon losses was lower for soils in the north of thetransect than in the south. In the long term, therefore, for a given heat input, decompositionrates would show larger increases in boreal northern sites than in warm temperate regions.The changes in climate produced by soil translocation were more clearly reflected bydecomposition rates in the acid soils than for calcareous soils. This indicates that the physicochemicalenvironment can have important differential effects on microbial decomposition ofthe labile and recalcitrant components of SOM.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER7511
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Soil Ecology
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 09 Oct 2015 05:56
Last Modified: 09 Oct 2015 05:56
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/20264