Titlebar

Export bibliographic data
Literature by the same author
plus on the publication server
plus at Google Scholar

 

Microbial physiology and soil CO2 efflux after 9 years of soil warming in a temperate forest : no indications for thermal adaptions

Title data

Schindlbacher, Andreas ; Schnecker, Jörg ; Takriti, Mounir ; Borken, Werner ; Wanek, Wolfgang:
Microbial physiology and soil CO2 efflux after 9 years of soil warming in a temperate forest : no indications for thermal adaptions.
In: Global Change Biology. Vol. 21 (2015) Issue 11 . - pp. 4265-4277.
ISSN 1365-2486
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.12996

Abstract in another language

Thermal adaptations of soil microorganisms could mitigate or facilitate global warming effects on soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and soil CO2 efflux. We incubated soil from warmed and control subplots of a forest soil warming experiment to assess if 9 years of soil warming affected the rates and the temperature sensitivity of the soil CO2 efflux, extracellular enzyme activities, microbial efficiency and gross N mineralization. Mineral soil (0-10 cm depth) was incubated at temperatures ranging from 3 - 23 °C. No adaptations to long-term warming were observed regarding the heterotrophic soil CO2 efflux (R10 warmed: 2.31 ± 0.15 μmol m−2 s−1, control: 2.34 ± 0.29 μmol m−2 s−1; Q10 warmed: 2.45 ± 0.06, control: 2.45 ± 0.04). Potential enzyme activities increased with incubation temperature but the temperature sensitivity of the enzymes did not differ between the warmed and the control soil. The ratio of C:N acquiring enzyme activities was significantly higher in the warmed soil. Microbial biomass specific respiration rates increased with incubation temperature, but the rates and the temperature sensitivity (Q10 warmed: 2.54 ± 0.23, control 2.75 ±0.17) did not differ between warmed and control soil. Microbial substrate use efficiency (SUE) declined with increasing incubation temperature in both, warmed and control soil. SUE and its temperature sensitivity (Q10 warmed: 0.84 ± 0.03, control: 0.88 ± 0.01) did not differ between warmed and control soil either. Gross N mineralization was invariant to incubation temperature and was not affected by long-term soil warming. Our results indicate that thermal adaptations of the microbial decomposer community are unlikely to occur in C-rich calcareous temperate forest soils.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER129031
Institutions of the University: Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Soil Ecology
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2016 10:23
Last Modified: 03 Aug 2016 10:23
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/33805