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Body movement distribution with respect to swimmer's glide position in human underwater undulatory swimming

Title data

Hochstein, Stefan ; Blickhan, Reinhard:
Body movement distribution with respect to swimmer's glide position in human underwater undulatory swimming.
In: Human Movement Science. Vol. 38 (December 2014) . - pp. 305-318.
ISSN 1872-7646
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2014.08.017

Official URL: Volltext

Project information

Project financing: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Abstract in another language

Abstract Human swimmers use undulatory motions similar to fish locomotion to attain high speeds. The human body is a non-smooth multi-body linkage system with restricted flexibility and is not primarily adapted to motion in the water. Due to anatomical limitations, the human swimmer is forced to deviate from the symmetric fish-like motion and to adjust his motion to his limited abilities. The goal of this paper is to investigates the movement of ten swimmers during human underwater undulatory in a still water pool and to find out to what extent the human swimmer approaches an ideal undulatory wave which is symmetric with respect to the extended gliding position. Therefore, it is necessary to (i) to ascertain the magnitude of the normalized dorsal, ventral and total amplitudes of the undulatory movements, (ii) to examine the distribution and symmetry/asymmetry of the dorsal, ventral and total amplitudes along the length of the swimming body, and (iii) to compare the differences in amplitude distribution and other indicators between different skill levels. The amplitude distribution of the dorsal and ventral deflection along the body (related to the swimmer’s stretched position) is highly asymmetric. Skilled swimmers swim with a more linear body wave and use a smaller range of envelop than less skilled swimmers. The durations of the up and down kicks show only minor differences. The down kick is slightly faster than the up kick. Although the down kick is more powerful than the up kick, the hip marker shows almost the same average swimming speed in both half-cycles.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Human undulatory swimming; Dolphin kick; Asymmetric amplitude distribution; Degree of asymmetry; Intra-cyclic velocity variations
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Cultural Studies > Department of Sport Science > Chair Sports Science I > Chair Sports Science I - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Andreas Hohmann
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Cultural Studies
Faculties > Faculty of Cultural Studies > Department of Sport Science
Faculties > Faculty of Cultural Studies > Department of Sport Science > Chair Sports Science I
Result of work at the UBT: No
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 500 Natural sciences
Date Deposited: 23 Aug 2017 09:22
Last Modified: 23 Aug 2017 09:22
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/39150