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Geothermal solute flux monitoring and the source and fate of solutes in the Snake River, Yellowstone National Park, WY

Title data

McCleskey, R. Blaine ; Lowenstern, Jacob B. ; Schaper, Jonas ; Nordstrom, Darrell Kirk ; Heasler, Henry P. ; Mahony, Dan:
Geothermal solute flux monitoring and the source and fate of solutes in the Snake River, Yellowstone National Park, WY.
In: Applied Geochemistry. (October 2016) Issue 73 . - pp. 142-156.
ISSN 0883-2927
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeochem.2016.08.006

Abstract in another language

The combined geothermal discharge from over 10,000 features in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) can be can be estimated from the Cl flux in the Madison, Yellowstone, Falls, and Snake Rivers. Over the last 30 years, the Cl flux in YNP Rivers has been calculated using discharge measurements and Cl concentrations determined in discrete water samples and it has been determined that approximately 12% of the Cl flux exiting YNP is from the Snake River. The relationship between electrical conductivity and concentrations of Cl and other geothermal solutes was quantified at a monitoring site located downstream from the thermal inputs in the Snake River. Beginning in 2012, continuous (15 min) electrical conductivity measurements have been made at the monitoring site. Combining continuous electrical conductivity and discharge data, the Cl and other geothermal solute fluxes were determined. The 2013–2015 Cl fluxes (5.3–5.8 kt/yr) determined using electrical conductivity are comparable to historical data. In addition, synoptic water samples and discharge data were obtained from sites along the Snake River under low-flow conditions of September 2014. The synoptic water study extended 17 km upstream from the monitoring site. Surface inflows were sampled to identify sources and to quantify solute loading. The Lewis River was the primary source of Cl, Na, K, Cl, SiO2, Rb, and As loads (50–80%) in the Snake River. The largest source of SO4 was from the upper Snake River (50%). Most of the Ca and Mg (50–55%) originate from the Snake Hot Springs. Chloride, Ca, Mg, Na, K, SiO2, F, HCO3, SO4, B, Li, Rb, and As behave conservatively in the Snake River, and therefore correlate well with conductivity (R2 ≥ 0.97).

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER139105
Keywords: Yellowstone National Park; Grand Teton National Park; Geothermal; Electrical conductivity; Specific conductance
Institutions of the University: Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Hydrology
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 12 Jan 2018 08:45
Last Modified: 12 Jan 2018 08:45
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/41300