Titlebar

Export bibliographic data
Literature by the same author
plus on the publication server
plus at Google Scholar

 

Flooding Stress in Plants

Title data

Mustroph, Angelika:
Flooding Stress in Plants.
In: Encyclopedia of Life Sciences (eLS). - No information : Wiley , 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/9780470015902.a0001317.pub3

Abstract in another language

As sessile organisms, plants cannot run away from unfavourable growth conditions. In order to survive stress conditions, for example flooding stress, they have evolved multiple adaptational mechanisms. Flooding stress restricts gas diffusion in and out of the plant cells, and subsequently leads to oxygen deficiency inside the plants. Plants can react to flooding with two strategies. On one hand, they can avoid the occurrence of oxygen deficiency inside by anatomical and morphological adaptations. These adaptations are mainly mediated by the gaseous plant hormone ethylene. On the other hand, they can also survive with oxygen deficiency, at least for some time. This adaptation includes the rearrangement of primary metabolism, for example through induction of fermentation. This transcriptional rearrangement is mediated by a set of transcription factors whose protein abundance directly depends on the oxygen concentration inside the plant cells.

Further data

Item Type: Lexikonartikel
Additional notes: BAYCEER147699
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Professorship Plant Genetics
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Professorship Plant Genetics > Professorship Plant Genetics- Univ.Prof. Dr. Angelika Mustroph
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 04 Apr 2019 08:43
Last Modified: 04 Apr 2019 08:43
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/48226