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Keeping the shoot above water : submergence triggers antithetical growth responses in stems and petioles of watercress (Nasturtium officinale)

Title data

Müller, Jana T. ; van Veen, Hans ; Bartylla, Malte M. ; Akman, Melis ; Pedersen, Ole ; Sun, Pulu ; Schuurink, Robert C. ; Takeuchi, Jun ; Todoroki, Yasushi ; Weig, Alfons ; Sasidharan, Rashmi ; Mustroph, Angelika:
Keeping the shoot above water : submergence triggers antithetical growth responses in stems and petioles of watercress (Nasturtium officinale).
In: New Phytologist. (2019) .
ISSN 1469-8137
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.16350

Abstract in another language

The molecular mechanisms controlling underwater elongation are based extensively on studies on internode elongation in the monocot rice (Oryza sativa) and petiole elongation in Rumex rosette species. Here we characterize underwater growth in the dicot Nasturtium officinale (watercress), a wild species of the Brassicaceae family, in which submergence enhances stem elongation and suppresses petiole growth.

We used a genome‐wide transcriptome analysis to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed antithetical growth responses. While submergence caused a substantial reconfiguration of the petiole and stem transcriptome, only little qualitative differences were observed between both tissues. A core submergence response included hormonal regulation and metabolic readjustment for energy conservation, while tissue‐specific responses were associated with defense, photosynthesis, and cell wall polysaccharides.

Transcriptomic and physiological characterization suggested that the established ethylene, abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) growth regulatory module for underwater elongation could not fully explain underwater growth in watercress.

Petiole growth suppression is likely attributed to a cell cycle arrest. Underwater stem elongation is driven by an early decline in ABA and is not primarily mediated by ethylene or GA. An enhanced stem elongation observed in the night period was not linked to hypoxia and suggests an involvement of circadian regulation.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: abscisic acid; antithetical growth; elongation; ethylene; hypoxia; gibberellic acid; submergence; watercress
Institutions of the University: Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Plant Physiology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Professor Plant Genetics
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Professor Plant Genetics > Professor Plant Genetics- Univ.Prof. Dr. Angelika Mustroph
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
500 Science > 570 Life sciences, biology
Date Deposited: 06 Dec 2019 08:27
Last Modified: 30 Jan 2020 12:55
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/53500