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Characterization of the physiology and cell–mineral interactions of the marine anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizer Rhodovulum iodosum – implications for Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation

Title data

Wu, Wenfang ; Swanner, Elizabeth D. ; Hao, Likai ; Zeitvogel, Fabian ; Obst, Martin ; Pan, Yongxin ; Kappler, Andreas:
Characterization of the physiology and cell–mineral interactions of the marine anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizer Rhodovulum iodosum – implications for Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation.
In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology. Vol. 88 (June 2014) Issue 3 . - pp. 503-515.
ISSN 1574-6941
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1574-6941.12315

Abstract in another language

Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (photoferrotrophs) are sug- gested to have contributed to the deposition of banded iron formations (BIFs) from oxygen-poor seawater. However, most studies evaluating the contribution of photoferrotrophs to Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation have used freshwater and not marine strains. Therefore, we investigated the physiology and mineral prod- ucts of Fe(II) oxidation by the marine photoferrotroph Rhodovulum iodosum. Poorly crystalline Fe(III) minerals formed initially and transformed to more crystalline goethite over time. During Fe(II) oxidation, cell surfaces were largely free of minerals. Instead, the minerals were co-localized with EPS suggesting that EPS plays a critical role in preventing cell encrustation, likely by binding Fe (III) and directing precipitation away from cell surfaces. Fe(II) oxidation rates increased with increasing initial Fe(II) concentration (0.43–4.07 mM) under a light intensity of 12 µmol quanta m-2s-1. Rates also increased as light intensity increased (from 3 to 20 µmol quanta m-2s-1), while the addition of Si did not significantly change Fe(II) oxidation rates. These results elaborate on how the physical and chemical conditions present in the Precambrian ocean controlled the activity of marine photoferrotrophs and confirm the possibility that such microorganisms could have oxidized Fe(II), generating the primary Fe(III) min- erals that were then deposited to some Precambrian BIFs.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER135388
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Heisenberg Professorship - Experimental Biogeochemistry
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Heisenberg Professorship - Experimental Biogeochemistry > Heisenberg Professorship - Experimental Biogeochemistry - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Martin Obst
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Result of work at the UBT: No
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
500 Science > 550 Earth sciences, geology
Date Deposited: 13 Aug 2020 08:40
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2020 08:53
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/56468