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Distributional patterns of endemic, native and alien species along a roadside elevation gradient in Tenerife, Canary Islands

Title data

Bacaro, G. ; Maccherini, S. ; Chiarucci, A. ; Jentsch, Anke ; Rocchini, D. ; Torri, D. ; Gioria, M. ; Tordoni, E. ; Martellos, S. ; Altobelli, A. ; Otto, R. ; Escudero, C. G. ; Fernández-Lugo, S. ; Fernández-Palacios, J. M. ; Arévalo, J. R.:
Distributional patterns of endemic, native and alien species along a roadside elevation gradient in Tenerife, Canary Islands.
In: Community Ecology. Vol. 16 (1 December 2015) Issue 2 . - pp. 223-234.
ISSN 1588-2756
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1556/168.2015.16.2.10

Abstract in another language

Invasion by alien plant species may be rapid and aggressive, causing erosion of local biodiversity. This is particularly true for islands, where natural and anthropogenic corridors promote the rapid spread of invasive plants. Although evidence shows that corridors may facilitate plant invasions, the question of how their importance in the spread of alien species varies along environmental gradients deserves more attention. Here, we addressed this issue by examining diversity patterns (species richness of endemic, native and alien species) along and across roads, along an elevation gradient from sea-level up to 2050 m a.s.l. in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain), at multiple spatial scales. Species richness was assessed using a multi-scale sampling design consisting of 59 T-transects of 150 m × 2 m, along three major roads each placed over the whole elevation gradient. Each transect was composed of three sections of five plots each: Section 1 was located on the road edges, Section 2 at intermediate distance, and Section 3 far from the road edge, the latter representing the “native community” less affected by road-specific disturbance. The effect of elevation and distance from roadsides was evaluated for the three groups of species (endemic, native and alien species), using parametric and non-parametric regression analyses as well as additive diversity partitioning. Differences among roads explained the majority of the variation in alien species richness and composition. Patterns in alien species richness were also affected by elevation, with a decline in richness with increasing elevation and no alien species recorded at high elevations. Elevation was the most important factor determining patterns in endemic and native species. These findings confirm that climate filtering reflected in varying patterns along elevational gradients is an important determinant of the richness of alien species (which are not adapted to high elevations), while anthropogenic pressures may explain the richness of alien species at low elevation.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Disturbance Ecology > Professor Disturbance Ecology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Anke Jentsch
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 08 Oct 2020 12:33
Last Modified: 08 Oct 2020 12:33
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/57886