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Increasing Daytime Stability Enhances Downslope Moisture Transport in the Subcanopy of an Even-Aged Conifer Forest in Western Oregon, USA

Title data

Drake, S. A. ; Rupp, D. E. ; Thomas, Christoph ; Oldroyd, H. J. ; Schulze, Mark ; Jones, J. A.:
Increasing Daytime Stability Enhances Downslope Moisture Transport in the Subcanopy of an Even-Aged Conifer Forest in Western Oregon, USA.
In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. Vol. 127 (2022) Issue 9 . - No. e2021JD036042.
ISSN 2169-8996
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2021JD036042

Official URL: Volltext

Project information

Project title:
Project's official titleProject's id
CAREER: A new direction into atmospheric near-surface transport for weak-wind conditions in plant canopies0955444

Project financing: National Science Foundation, USA

Abstract in another language

Abstract Mountain breezes, including katabatic and anabatic flows, and temperature inversions are common features of forested mountain landscapes. However, the effects of mountain breezes on moisture transport in forests and implications for regional climate change are not well understood. A detailed, instrumented study was conducted from July to September 2012 in an even-aged conifer forest in the Oregon Cascade Range to investigate how temperature profiles within the forest canopy influenced atmospheric surface layer processes that ventilate the forest. Subcanopy inversion strength has a bimodal relationship to subcanopy wind speed and moisture flux from the forest. On days with relatively modest heating of the top of the canopy and weak subcanopy inversions, above canopy winds more efficiently mix subcanopy air, leading to greater than average vertical moisture flux and weaker than average along-slope, subcanopy water vapor advection. On days with strong heating of the top of the canopy and a strong subcanopy inversion, vertical moisture flux is suppressed, and daytime downslope winds are stronger than average under the canopy. Increased downslope winds lead to increased downslope transport of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and other scalars under the canopy. Increasing summer vapor pressure deficit in the Pacific Northwest will enhance both processes: vertical moisture transport by mountain breezes when subcanopy inversions are weak and downslope water vapor transport when subcanopy inversions are strong. These mountain breeze dynamics have implications for climate refugia in forested mountains, forest plantations, and other forested regions with a similar canopy structure and regional atmospheric forcings.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: mountain; subcanopy; wind; forest; advection; moisture
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Micrometeorology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Micrometeorology > Professor Micrometeorology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Christoph K. Thomas
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Ecology and the Environmental Sciences
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Nonlinear Dynamics
Faculties
Profile Fields
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
500 Science > 500 Natural sciences
500 Science > 550 Earth sciences, geology
Date Deposited: 07 May 2022 21:00
Last Modified: 31 May 2022 12:31
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/69557