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Spider Silk Coatings as a Bioshield to Reduce Periprosthetic Fibrous Capsule Formation

Title data

Zeplin, Philip H. ; Maksimovikj, Nathalie C. ; Jordan, Martin C. ; Nickel, Joachim ; Lang, Gregor ; Leimer, Axel H. ; Römer, Lin ; Scheibel, Thomas:
Spider Silk Coatings as a Bioshield to Reduce Periprosthetic Fibrous Capsule Formation.
In: Advanced Functional Materials. Vol. 24 (2014) Issue 18 . - pp. 2658-2666.
ISSN 1616-301X
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201302813

Official URL: Volltext

Abstract in another language

Medical grade silicones have been employed for decades in medical applications.
The associated long-term complications, such as capsule formation
and contraction have, however, not been fully addressed yet. The aim
of this study is to elucidate if capsule formation and/or contraction can be
mitigated by veiling the surface of the silicone during the critical phase after
implantation. Medical grade silicone implants are homogeneously coated
with a micrometer thin layer of recombinant spider silk proteins. Biocompatibility
analysis in vitro and in vivo focuses on specifi c physiological reactions.
Applying quantitative methods for the determination of marker-specifi c gene
expression and protein concentration, it is detected that the silk coating
inhibits fi broblast proliferation, collagen I synthesis, and differentiation of
monocytes into CD68-positive histiocytes. It signifi cantly reduces capsule
thickness, post-operative infl ammation, synthesis and re-modeling of extracellular
matrix, and expression of contracture-mediating factors. Therefore,
coatings made of recombinant spider silk proteins considerably reduce major
post-operative complications associated with implantation of silicone-based
alloprosthetics, such as capsular fi brosis and contraction, rendering spider
silk coatings a bioshield for such implants.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: medical grade silicone;
spider silk;
capsular contracture;
fibrosis;
bioshields
Institutions of the University: Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science > Chair Biomaterials > Chair Biomaterials - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science > Chair Biomaterials
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Advanced Materials
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Molecular Biosciences
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Polymer and Colloid Science
Profile Fields > Emerging Fields > Food and Health Sciences
Profile Fields
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields
Profile Fields > Emerging Fields
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 600 Technology, medicine, applied sciences > 620 Engineering
Date Deposited: 27 Feb 2015 11:25
Last Modified: 26 Nov 2015 10:51
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/7597