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Two Rumex species from contrasting hydrological niches regulate flooding tolerance through distinct mechanisms

Title data

van Veen, Hans ; Mustroph, Angelika ; Barding, Gregory A. ; Vergeer-van Eijk, Marleen ; Welschen-Evertman, Rob A. M. ; Pedersen, Ole ; Visser, Eric J. W. ; Larive, Cynthia K. ; Pierik, Ronald ; Bailey-Serres, Julia ; Voesenek, Laurentius A. C. J. ; Sasidharan, Rashmi:
Two Rumex species from contrasting hydrological niches regulate flooding tolerance through distinct mechanisms.
In: The Plant Cell. Vol. 25 (November 2013) Issue 11 . - pp. 4691-4707.
ISSN 1532-298X
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1105/tpc.113.119016

Official URL: Volltext

Abstract in another language

Global climate change has increased flooding events, which affect both natural vegetation dynamics and crop productivity. The flooded environment is lethal for most plant species because it restricts gas exchange and induces an energy and carbon crisis. Flooding survival strategies have been studied in Oryza sativa, a cultivated monocot. However, our understanding of plant adaptation to natural flood-prone environments remains scant, even though wild plants represent a valuable resource of tolerance mechanisms that could be used to generate stress-tolerant crops. Here we identify mechanisms that mediate the distinct flooding survival strategies of two related wild dicot species: Rumex palustris and Rumex acetosa. Whole transcriptome sequencing and metabolite profiling reveal flooding-induced metabolic reprogramming specific to R. acetosa. By contrast, R. palustris uses the early flooding signal ethylene to increase survival by regulating shade avoidance and photomorphogenesis genes to outgrow submergence and by priming submerged plants for future low oxygen stress. These results provide molecular resolution of flooding survival strategies of two species occupying distinct hydrological niches. Learning how these contrasting flood adaptive strategies evolved in nature will be instrumental for the development of stress-tolerant crop varieties that deliver enhanced yields in a changing climate.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: PubMed-ID: 21563365
BAYCEER120218
Institutions of the University: Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Plant Physiology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Professorship Plant Genetics
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Professorship Plant Genetics > Professorship Plant Genetics- Univ.Prof. Dr. Angelika Mustroph
Profile Fields
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Molecular Biosciences
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center for Molecular Biosciences - BZMB
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Result of work at the UBT: No
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 570 Life sciences, biology
500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)
Date Deposited: 01 Apr 2015 07:02
Last Modified: 08 Mar 2016 11:07
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/9614