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Paternity re-visited in a recovering population of Caribbean leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea)

Title data

Figgener, Christine ; Chacón-Chaverri, Didiher ; Jensen, Michael P. ; Feldhaar, Heike:
Paternity re-visited in a recovering population of Caribbean leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea).
Department of Behavioural Physiology and Sociobiology, Biozentrum, Am Hubland, University of Würzburg, D-97074 Würzburg, Germany IDP Marine Biology, Texas A and M University, 730 Lamar Street, College Station, TX 77843-4115, USA; Wider Caribbean Sea Turtle Conservation Network-Costa Rica (WIDECAST), Apdo. 496-1100 Tibás, Costa Rica; National Research Council under contract to Marine Mammal& Turtle Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, La Jolla, CA; Animal Ecology I, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany
In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. Vol. 475 (February 2016) . - pp. 114-123.
ISSN 0022-0981
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jembe.2015.11.014

Abstract in another language

Sea turtles in general are promiscuous breeders, but previous leatherback paternity studies found only a very low level of multiple paternity or none at all. Three highly polymorphic microsatellite markers (Dc99, Cc117, and Ei8) were used to investigate the paternity of a recovering population of leatherback turtles nesting at Playa Gandoca in Costa Rica, which is part of the Atlantic Costa Rican leatherback nesting population. The aim of this study was to (i) detect multiple paternity, (ii) compare the results to previous studies in the same and different nesting populations, (iii) consider the possibility of sperm storage, (iv) explore the possibility of successful inter-nesting mating taking place, and (v) determine the effect of small population size on mating patterns. Tissue samples from females and hatchlings were collected from one to three consecutive clutches (35 clutches total) of 18 nesting females included in the assay with an average sampling effort of 21.91% of offspring per clutch. Evidence of multiple paternity was found in four out of 18 females (22.22%), which had mated with two to three different males. The results from this study indicate that multiple paternity is more common than previously observed for the Atlantic Costa Rican leatherback nesting population. The analyses of successive clutches from the multiply mated females showed that paternal contribution varies between successive clutches and “new” fathers in consecutive clutches suggest the possibility of successful inter-nesting mating.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER133073
Keywords: Marine turtles; Endangered species; Microsatellites; Costa Rica; Sperm storage; Multiple paternity
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Animal Ecology I
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Professorship Animal Population Ecology > Professorship Animal Population Ecology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Heike Feldhaar
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Professorship Animal Population Ecology
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 500 Natural sciences
500 Science > 570 Life sciences, biology
500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)
Date Deposited: 10 Dec 2015 09:43
Last Modified: 10 Aug 2016 09:10
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/26467