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Pay the farmer, or buy the land? : Cost-effectiveness of payments for ecosystem services versus land purchases or easements in Central Kenya

Title data

Curran, Michael ; Kiteme, Boniface ; Wünscher, Wünscher ; Koellner, Thomas ; Hellweg, Stefanie:
Pay the farmer, or buy the land? : Cost-effectiveness of payments for ecosystem services versus land purchases or easements in Central Kenya.
ETH Zürich, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Chair of Ecological Systems Design, Zürich, Switzerland; Center for Training and Integrated Research in Arid and Semi-Arid Lands Development (CETRAD), Nanyuki, Kenya; Centre for Development Research (ZEF), University of Bonn, Germany; Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Geosciences, University of Bayreuth, Germany; ETH Zürich, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Chair of Ecological Systems Design, Zürich, Switzerland
In: Ecological Economics. Vol. 127 (July 2016) . - pp. 59-67.
ISSN 0921-8009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2016.03.016

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Abstract in another language

Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) have emerged as a popular conservation tool, yet evaluation alongside other direct conservation strategies remains piecemeal. We prospectively compared cost-effectiveness of PES to Land Purchases or Easements (LPE) in Central Kenya. We spatially predicted opportunity costs and land prices using household survey and literature data, and sampled conservation management costs from four regional conservation organizations. We simulated a fixed-budget, spatial ecological–economic site selection process for conservation intervention (PES or LPE) over 30 years. We included effects of land markets, property value fluctuations, rising agricultural productivity and climate change. Depending on the scenario, the LPE strategy led to larger reserves (by 26%–610%), better representation of mammal species' ranges (by 47%–112%) and lower unit costs (by 26%–48%). Adding a yearly egalitarian social development payment to the LPE strategy did not increase costs beyond the basic PES model. Our findings were robust to discount rate choice, but cost savings of LPE only materialized after about a decade. Furthermore, Kenyan law restricts foreign land ownership and the use of land easements, thus simpler institutional requirements make PES a more immediate, if less effective, property-based tool.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER136422
Keywords: Payments for Ecosystem/Environmental Services; Conservation Land Purchases; Conservation easements; Conservation performance payments; Cost-effectiveness
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professorship Ecological Services > Professorship Ecological Services - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Thomas Köllner
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professorship Ecological Services
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 550 Earth sciences, geology
Date Deposited: 25 May 2016 07:01
Last Modified: 10 Aug 2016 07:41
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/32447