Titlebar

Export bibliographic data
Literature by the same author
plus on the publication server
plus at Google Scholar

 

Area modulates the effect of elevation but not of land use or canopy on tropical plant species richness

Title data

Hemp, Andreas ; Del Fabbro, Corina ; Fischer, Markus:
Area modulates the effect of elevation but not of land use or canopy on tropical plant species richness.
In: Biodiversity and Conservation. Vol. 30 (2021) . - pp. 4265-4277.
ISSN 1572-9710
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-021-02304-6

Official URL: Volltext

Abstract in another language

One of the few general patterns in ecology is the increase of species richness with area. However, factors driving species-area relationship (SAR) are under debate, and the role of human-induced changes has been overlooked so far. Furthermore, SAR studies in tropical regions, in particular in multilayered rain forests are scarce. On the other side, studies of global change-induced impacts on biodiversity have become increasingly important, particular in the tropics, where these impacts are especially pronounced. Here, we investigated if area modulates the effect of land use, elevation and canopy on plant species richness. For the first time we studied SAR in multilayered tropical forests considering all functional groups. We selected 13 natural and disturbed habitats on Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, distributed over an elevational range of 3700 m. In each habitat type, we set up three to six modified Whittaker plots. We recorded all plant species in 64 plots and 640 subplots and described SAR using the power function. Area consistently modulated effects of elevation on plant species richness, partly effects of land use but not effects of plant canopy. Thus, area needs to be taken into account when studying elevational plant species richness patterns. In contrast to temperate regions open and forest habitats did not differ in SAR, probably due to a distinct vertical vegetation zonation in tropical forests. Therefore, it is important to consider all vegetation layers including epiphytes when studying SAR in highly structured tropical regions.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Elevation gradient; Global change; Kilimanjaro; Land use; Species-area
relationship
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Plant Systematics
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 570 Life sciences, biology
500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)
Date Deposited: 26 Mar 2022 22:00
Last Modified: 20 Apr 2022 13:39
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/69043