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Precipitation of enzymes and organic matter by aluminium : impacts on carbon mineralization

Title data

Scheel, Thorsten ; Pritsch, Karin ; Schloter, Michael ; Kalbitz, Karsten:
Precipitation of enzymes and organic matter by aluminium : impacts on carbon mineralization.
In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science. Vol. 171 (2008) Issue 6 . - pp. 900-907.
ISSN 1436-8730
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/jpln.200700146

Abstract in another language

The precipitation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by aluminum (Al) results in a stable soil organic matter (OM) fraction. Extracellular enzymes can also be removed from soil solution by sorption or precipitation, but whether this affects their activity and their importance for carbon (C) mineralization is largely unknown. We studied the activity of eight extracellular enzymes, precipitated by Al together with DOM, in relation to C mineralization of the precipitated OM. Dissolved OM was obtained from the Oi and Oa horizon of two forest soils and precipitated at different Al : C ratios and pH values to achieve a large variation in composition and C mineralization of precipitated OM. All eight enzymes were present in a functional state in precipitated OM. On average 53% of DOM was precipitated, containing on average 17%-41% of the enzyme activity (EA) involved in C degradation (chitinase, cellobiohydrolase, -glucosidase, glucuronidase, lacasse, and xylosidase) previously present in soil solution. In contrast, on average only 4%-7% of leucine-aminopeptidase and acid-phosphatase activity was found in precipitated OM. The EA found in precipitates significantly increased the percentage of C mineralized of precipitated OM, with a stronger influence of C-degrading enzymes than enzymes involved in N and P cycling. However, after 8 weeks of incubation the correlations between EA and C mineralization disappeared, despite substantial EA being still present and only 0.5%-7.7% of C mineralized. Thus, degradation of precipitated OM seems to be governed by EA during the first degradation phase, but the long-term stability of precipitated OM is probably related to its chemical properties.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER49163
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Soil Ecology
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 11 Sep 2015 06:33
Last Modified: 11 Sep 2015 06:33
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/19107