Titlebar

Export bibliographic data
Literature by the same author
plus on the publication server
plus at Google Scholar

 

Mobile arsenic species in unpolluted and polluted soils

Title data

Huang, Jen-How ; Matzner, Egbert:
Mobile arsenic species in unpolluted and polluted soils.
In: Science of the Total Environment. Vol. 377 (2007) Issue 2-3 . - pp. 308-318.
ISSN 0048-9697
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2007.01.059

Abstract in another language

The fate and behaviour of total arsenic (As) and of As species in soils is of concern for the quality of drinking water. To estimate the relevance of organic As species and the mobility of different As species, we evaluated the vertical distribution of organic and inorganic As species in two uncontaminated and two contaminated upland soils. Dimethylarsinic acid (up to 6 ng As g− 1), trimethylarsine oxide (up to 1.5 ng As g− 1), 4 unidentified organic As species (up to 3 ng As g− 1) and arsenobetaine (up to 15 ng As g− 1), were detected in the forest soils. Arsenobetaine was the dominant organic As species in both unpolluted and polluted forest soils. No organic As species were detected in the contaminated grassland soil. The organic As species may account for up to 30% of the mobile fraction in the unpolluted forest floor, but never exceed 9% in the unpolluted mineral soil. Highest concentrations of organic As species were found in the forest floors. The concentrations of extractable arsenite were highest in the surface horizons of all soils and may represent up to 36% of total extractable As. The concentrations of extractable arsenate were also highest in the Oa layers in the forest soils and decreased steeply in the mineral soil. In conclusion, the investigated forest soils contain a number of organic As species. The organic As species in forest soils seem to result from throughfall and litterfall and are retained mostly in the forest floor. The relative high concentrations of extractable arsenite, one of the most toxic As species, and arsenate in the forest floor point to the risk of their transfer to surface water by superficial flow under heavy rain events.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER30172
Keywords: Arsenic speciation; Forest soil; Forest floor; Grassland soil; Mobility
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Soil Ecology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Former Professors > Chair Soil Ecology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Egbert Matzner
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 11 Sep 2015 06:33
Last Modified: 10 Mar 2016 08:33
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/19136