Titlebar

Export bibliographic data
Literature by the same author
plus on the publication server
plus at Google Scholar

 

Turgor Changes in Morchella esculenta during Translocation and Sclerotial Formation

Title data

Amir, Rachel ; Steudle, Ernst ; Levanon, Dan ; Hadar, Yitzhak ; Chet, Ilan:
Turgor Changes in Morchella esculenta during Translocation and Sclerotial Formation.
In: Experimental Mycology. Vol. 19 (1995) Issue 2 . - pp. 129-136.
ISSN 0147-5975
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1006/emyc.1995.1015

Abstract in another language

Turgor pressure was measured during six stages of growth and pseudosclerotial formation in Morchella esculenta indirectly (by thermocouple psychrometer) and directly (by cell pressure probe). The fungus was grown on a split plate, enabling separation between mycelium growing on defined medium (water potential -0.5 MPa) and sclerotia which formed on glucose noble agar (water potential -2.1 MPa). Under these conditions, nutrients were translocated from the mycelium to the developing sclerotia. Direct turgor potential measurements showed that the gradient between the mycelium and the sclerotia increases during sclerotial development (reaching a maximum of 0.53 MPa), thereby suggesting that translocation is a turgor-driven mass flow. During sclerotial development, the turgor potential in the peripheral tips of the sclerotial hyphae must be high enough to bring about the growth of the numerous hyphae, which comprise the sclerotium, and simultaneously low enough in the primary hyphae, which carry the stream of nutrients, to am-act translocation from the mycelium. Since sclerotial hyphae are too small for direct measurement by cell pressure probe, a psychrometer was used, revealing high turgor in the sclerotial tissue (1.2 MPa) during sclerotial development. Direct measurement in the primary hyphae at this time gave a value of 0.7 MPa. Taken together, these measurements indicate the presence of a turgor gradient inside the sclerotial tissue, from the primary hyphae to the peripheral cells. The present study is the first to make use of a cell pressure probe to measure turgor gradients in a fungus during translocation followed by sclerotial morphogenesis. (C) 1995 Academic Press, Inc.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: No
Additional notes: BAYCEER33680
Institutions of the University: Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Plant Ecology
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 30 Sep 2015 05:56
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2015 05:56
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/20015