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Sources of stream sulfate at the Hubbard Brook Experimental forest : long-term analysis using stable isotopes

Title data

Alewell, Christine ; Mitchell, Myron J. ; Likens, Gene E. ; Krouse, H. Roy:
Sources of stream sulfate at the Hubbard Brook Experimental forest : long-term analysis using stable isotopes.
In: Biogeochemistry. Vol. 44 (1999) Issue 3 . - pp. 281-299.
ISSN 1573-515X
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1006058913822

Abstract in another language

Sulfur deposition in the northeastern U.S. has been decreasing since the 1970s and there has been a concomitant decrease in the SO42- lost from drainage waters from forest catchments of this region. It has been established previously that the SO42- lost from drainage waters exceeds SO42- inputs in bulk precipitation, but the cause for this imbalance has not been resolved. The use of stable S isotopes and the availability of archived bulk precipitation and stream water samples at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in New Hampshire provided a unique opportunity to evaluate potential sources and sinks of S by analyzing the long-term patterns (1966-1994) of the d34S values of SO42- . In bulk precipitation adjacent to the Ecosystem Laboratory and near Watershed 6 the d34S values were greater (mean: 4.5 and 4.2l, respectively) and showed more variation (variance: 0.49 and 0.30) than stream samples from Watersheds 5 (W5) and 6 (W6) (mean: 3.2 and 3.7; variance: 0.09 and 0.08, respectively). These results are consistent with other studies in forest catchments that have combined results for mass balances with stable S isotopes. These results indicate that for those sites, including the HBEF, where atmospheric inputs are -1 yr-1 , most of the deposited SO42- cycles through the biomass before it is released to stream water. Results from W5, which had a whole-tree harvest in 1983-1984 showed that adsorption/desorption processes play an important role in regulating net SO42- retention for this watershed-ecosystem. Although the isotopic results suggest the importance of S mineralization, conclusive evidence that there is net mineralization has not yet been shown. However, S mass balances and the isotopic result are consistent with the mineralization of organic S being a major contributor to the SO42- in stream waters at the HBEF.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER7238
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Soil Ecology
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 09 Oct 2015 05:56
Last Modified: 13 Apr 2018 08:40
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/20292