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Antarctic Marine Animal Forests : Three-Dimensional Communities in Southern Ocean Ecosystems

Title data

Gutt, Julian ; Cummings, Vonda ; Dayton, Paul ; Isla, Enrique ; Jentsch, Anke ; Schiaparelli, Stefano:
Antarctic Marine Animal Forests : Three-Dimensional Communities in Southern Ocean Ecosystems.
In: Rossi, Sergio ; Bramanti, Lorenzo ; Gori, Andrea ; Orejas Saco del Valle, Covadonga (ed.): Marine Animal Forests : The Ecology of Benthic Biodiversity Hotspots. - Cham : Springer , 2017 . - pp. 1-30
ISBN 978-3-319-21011-7
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-17001-5_8-1

Abstract in another language

Both Southern Ocean and terrestrial systems contain three-dimensional biotic components that are key in shaping and defining their respective ecosystems and communities. Antarctic suspension-feeding communities, which inhabit the shelf of the Southern Ocean, resemble “Terrestrial Vegetation Forests” (TVF) or shrublands and support the concept of “Antarctic Marine Animal Forests” (AMAF). They comprise mostly sessile animals, provide microniches for an associated mobile fauna, and are fragmented and regionally mixed with other communities. On land, only high mountains and very dry regions are unsuitable for TVF, analogous to the virtual absence of AMAF from the deep sea (>1000 m). Besides fundamental differences between these systems in energy flow and other ecological drivers such as light requirements and dispersal opportunities, both “forests” experience similar disturbances, which impact ecosystem dynamics and diversity in similar ways. While land use affects and reduces terrestrial forests, climate change and fishing impacts are the most serious threats to the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Research priorities for a better understanding of “Antarctic Marine Animal Forests” demand (1) mapping biotic communities and their structural and functional diversity, especially in terms of hot and cold spots; (2) understanding ecological function, including ecosystem productivity and dynamics; (3) cross-system comparison to identify generality or uniqueness in ecosystem structure and dynamics; and (4) implication of existing and new research approaches and conservation strategies.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a book
Refereed: No
Additional notes: BAYCEER134909
BAYCEER144860
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professorship Disturbance Ecology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professorship Disturbance Ecology > Professorship Disturbance Ecology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Anke Jentsch
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 11 Aug 2016 07:24
Last Modified: 08 Apr 2019 10:06
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/33885