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Phosphorus in forest ecosystems : New insights from an ecosystem nutrition perspective

Title data

Lang, Friederike ; Bauhus, Jürgen ; Frossard, Emmanuel ; George, Eckhard ; Kaiser, Klaus ; Kaupenjohann, Martin ; Krüger, Jaane ; Matzner, Egbert ; Polle, Andrea ; Prietzel, Jörg ; Rennenberg, Heinz ; Wellbrock, Nicole:
Phosphorus in forest ecosystems : New insights from an ecosystem nutrition perspective.
In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science. Vol. 179 (2016) Issue 2 . - pp. 129-135.
ISSN 1436-8730
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/jpln.201500541

Abstract in another language

Phosphorus is one of the major limiting factors of primary productivity in terrestrial ecosystems and, thus, the P demand of plants might be among the most important drivers of soil and ecosystem development.The P cycling in forest ecosystems seems an ideal example to illustrate the concept ofecosystem nutrition. Ecosystem nutrition combines and extents the traditional concepts of nutrientcycling and ecosystem ecology. The major extension is to consider also the loading and unloadingof nutrient cycles and the impact of nutrient acquiring and recycling processes on overall ecosystem properties. Ecosystem nutrition aims to integrate nutrient related aspects at different scales and indifferent ecosystem compartments including all processes, interactions and feedbacks associated with the nutrition of an ecosystem. We review numerous previous studies dealing with P nutrition from this ecosystemnutrition perspective. The available information contributes to the description ofbasic ecosystem characteristics such as emergence, hierarchy, and robustness. In result, we wereable to refine Odum’s hypothesis on P nutrition strategies along ecosystem succession to substraterelated ecosystem nutrition and development.We hypothesize that at sites rich in mineral-bound P,plant and microbial communities tend to introduce P from primary minerals into the biogeochemicalP cycle (acquiring systems), and hence the tightness of the P cycle is ofminor relevance for ecosystemfunctioning. In contrast, tight P recycling is a crucial emergent property of forest ecosystems established at sites poor in mineral bound P (recycling systems). We conclude that the integration of knowledge on nutrient cycling, soil science, and ecosystemecology into holistic ecosystemnutrition will provide an entirely new view on soil–plant–microbe interactions.Key words: ecosystem properties / P recycling / P nutrition strategy / forest nutrition / P acquiring

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER133935
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Soil Ecology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Former Professors > Chair Soil Ecology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Egbert Matzner
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 11 Aug 2016 09:49
Last Modified: 11 Aug 2016 09:49
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/33900