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Influence of altitude training modality on performance and total haemoglobin mass in elite swimmers

Title data

Gough, Clare E. ; Saunders, Philo U. ; Fowlie, John ; Savage, Bernard ; Pyne, David B. ; Anson, Judith M. ; Wachsmuth, Nadine ; Prommer, Nicole ; Gore, Christopher J.:
Influence of altitude training modality on performance and total haemoglobin mass in elite swimmers.
In: European Journal of Applied Physiology. Vol. 112 (September 2012) Issue 9 . - pp. 3275-3285.
ISSN 1439-6327
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-011-2291-7

Abstract in another language

We compared changes in performance and total haemoglobin mass (tHb) of elite swimmers in the weeks following either Classic or Live High:Train Low (LHTL) altitude training. Twenty-six elite swimmers (15 male, 11 female, 21.4 +/- 2.7 years; mean +/- SD) were divided into two groups for 3 weeks of either Classic or LHTL altitude training. Swimming performances over 100 or 200 m were assessed before altitude, then 1, 7, 14 and 28 days after returning to sea-level. Total haemoglobin mass was measured twice before altitude, then 1 and 14 days after return to sea-level. Changes in swimming performance in the first week after Classic and LHTL were compared against those of Race Control (n = 11), a group of elite swimmers who did not complete altitude training. In addition, a season-long comparison of swimming performance between altitude and non-altitude groups was undertaken to compare the progression of performances over the course of a competitive season. Regardless of altitude training modality, swimming performances were substantially slower 1 day (Classic 1.4 +/- 1.3% and LHTL 1.6 +/- 1.6%; mean +/- 90% confidence limits) and 7 days (0.9 +/- 1.0% and 1.9 +/- 1.1%) after altitude compared to Race Control. In both groups, performances 14 and 28 days after altitude were not different from pre-altitude. The season-long comparison indicated that no clear advantage was obtained by swimmers who completed altitude training. Both Classic and LHTL elicited ~4% increases in tHb. Although altitude training induced erythropoeisis, this physiological adaptation did not transfer directly into improved competitive performance in elite swimmers

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: adaptation; Adaptation; Physiological; Adolescent; Adult; altitude; altitude training; ANALYSIS; athletes; ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE; Australia; CONTROLLED TRIAL; Erythrocyte Count; Female; haemoglobin; Haemoglobin mass; hemoglobin; Hemoglobins; humans; Male; MASS; methods; PERFORMANCE; Physical Education and Training; physiology; Research; SEA-LEVEL; Sport; swimming; SWIMMING PERFORMANCE; training; Young Adult
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Cultural Studies > Department of Sport Science > Professorship Sports Science IV
Faculties > Faculty of Cultural Studies > Department of Sport Science > Professorship Sports Science IV > Professorship Sports Science IV - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Walter Schmidt
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 600 Technology, medicine, applied sciences > 610 Medicine and health
Date Deposited: 09 Sep 2019 14:52
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2019 14:52
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/40589