Titlebar

Export bibliographic data
Literature by the same author
plus on the publication server
plus at Google Scholar

 

Wood decay rates of 13 temperate tree species in relation to wood properties, enzyme activities and organismic diversities

Title data

Kahl, Tiemo ; Arnstadt, Tobias ; Baber, Kristin ; Bässler, Claus ; Bauhus, Jürgen ; Borken, Werner ; Buscot, François ; Floren, Andreas ; Heibl, Christoph ; Hessenmöller, Dominik ; Hofrichter, Martin ; Hoppe, Björn ; Kellner, Harald ; Krüger, Dirk ; Linsenmair, Karl Eduard ; Matzner, Egbert ; Otto, Peter ; Purahong, Witton ; Seilwinder, Claudia ; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef ; Wende, Beate ; Weisser, Wolfgang W. ; Gossner, Martin M.:
Wood decay rates of 13 temperate tree species in relation to wood properties, enzyme activities and organismic diversities.
In: Forest Ecology and Management. Vol. 391 (May 2017) . - pp. 86-95.
ISSN 0378-1127
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2017.02.012

Abstract in another language

Deadwood decay is an important ecosystem process in forest ecosystems, but the relative contribution of specific wood properties of tree species, activities of wood-degrading enzymes, and decomposer communitiessuch as fungi and insects is unclear. We ask whether wood properties, in particular differences between angiosperms and gymnosperms, and organismic diversity of colonizers contribute to wood decomposition. To test this, we exposed deadwood logs of 13 tree species, covering four gymnosperms and nine angiosperm species, in 30 plots under different forest management in three regions in Germany. After a decomposition time of 6.5 years Carpinus betulus and Fagus sylvatica showed the highestdecay rates. We found a positive correlation of decay rate with enzyme activities, chemical wood properties (S, K concentration) and organismic diversity, while, heartwood character, lignin content, extractive concentration and phenol content were negatively correlated with decay rate across all 13 tree species. By applying a multi-model inference approach we found that the activity of the wooddegrading enzymes laccase and endocellulase, beetle diversity, heartwood presence, wood ray heightand fungal diversity were the most important predictor variables for wood decay. Although we werenot able to identify direct cause and effect relations by our approach, we conclude that enzyme activity and organismic diversity are the main drivers of wood decay rate, which greatly differed among tree species. Maintaining high tree species diversity will therefore result in high structural deadwood diversity in terms of decay rate and decay stage.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER137742
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Soil Ecology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Former Professors > Chair Soil Ecology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Egbert Matzner
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 08 Jan 2018 13:13
Last Modified: 10 Apr 2018 11:00
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/41204