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Fertility transition in Maputo : a socio-spatial analysis

Title data

Hansine, Rogers:
Fertility transition in Maputo : a socio-spatial analysis.
2017
Event: ECAS7 : 7th European Conference of African Studies , 29.06.- 01.07.2017 , Basel, Schweiz.
(Conference item: Conference , Paper )

Project information

Project financing: Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst

Abstract in another language

In sub-Sahara Africa, the distinction between the dynamics of fertility rates in urban areas and fertility rates in rural areas have been the focus of the overwhelming majority of comparative studies about regional differences in fertility rates (see Shapiro & Tambashe, 1999; Shapiro & Gebreselassie, 2008; Lesthaeghe, 2014 ). However, the fertility rates within urban areas are not necessarily uniform (Weeks, Getis, Hill, Gadalla, & Rashed, 2004). According to Garenne & Joseph (2002) and Lesthaeghe (2014), African urban areas have lower fertility rates than rural areas and in urban areas, fertility rates have been declining much faster than those in rural areas. Although, the demographic data about intra-urban fertility rates in Africa appears to be scarce, through DHS (Demographic and Health Survey) data (1997, 2003 and 2011) and censuses (1997 and 2007) coupled with a literature review, this work attempts to a) investigate the association between socio-spatial differentiation and fertility disparities in Maputo city (Mozambique's capital city) and b) critically discuss the empirical and theoretical implications of engaging in an intra-urban analysis of fertility transition. The results suggest that Maputo´s spatial pattern of fertility is closely associated with socio-spatial variability of socio economic characteristics in the city. As expected, low levels of fertility rates are to be found in the most developed and urbanized district, whereas throughout the less developed districts, fertility is relatively high. This seems to be consistent with similar conclusions about fertility transition hypothesis elsewhere in Africa (see J. R. Weeks, Getis, Hill, Gadalla, & Rashed, 2004).

Further data

Item Type: Conference item (Paper)
Refereed: No
Keywords: Fertility; Urban; Africa
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Social and Population Geography
Faculties
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 300 Social sciences
300 Social sciences > 300 Social sciences, sociology and anthropology
300 Social sciences > 360 Social problems, social services
900 History and geography > 910 Geography, travel
900 History and geography > 960 History of Africa
Date Deposited: 13 Mar 2018 08:31
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2019 12:48
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/42770