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Solifluction meets vegetation : the role of biogeomorphic feedbacks for turf-banked solifluction lobe development

Title data

Eichel, Jana ; Draebing, Daniel ; Klingbeil, Lasse ; Wieland, Markus ; Eling, Christian ; Schmidtlein, Sebastian ; Kuhlmann, Heiner ; Dikau, Richard:
Solifluction meets vegetation : the role of biogeomorphic feedbacks for turf-banked solifluction lobe development.
In: Earth Surface Processes and Landforms. Vol. 42 (2017) Issue 11 . - pp. 1623-1635.
ISSN 1096-9837
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.4102

Official URL: Volltext

Project information

Project financing: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DI414/22-1)
Gesellschaft für Erdkunde zu Köln e.V.
Humboldt-Ritter-Penck-Stiftung of the Gesellschaft für Erdkunde zu Berlin

Abstract in another language

Abstract Vegetation is an important factor influencing solifluction processes, while at the same time, solifluction processes and landforms influence species composition, fine-scale distribution and corresponding ecosystem functioning. However, how feedbacks between plants and solifluction processes influence the development of turf-banked solifluction lobes (TBLs) and their geomorphic and vegetation patterns is still poorly understood. We addressed this knowledge gap in a detailed biogeomorphic investigation in the Turtmann glacier foreland (Switzerland). Methods employed include geomorphic and vegetation mapping, terrain assessment with unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and temperature logging. Results were subsequently integrated with knowledge from previous geomorphic and ecologic studies into a conceptual model. Our results show that geomorphic and vegetation patterns at TBLs are closely linked through the lobe elements tread, risers and ridge. A conceptual four-stage biogeomorphic model of TBL development with ecosystem engineering by the dwarf shrub Dryas octopetala as the dominant process can explain these interlinked patterns. Based on this model, we demonstrate that TBLs are biogeomorphic structures and follow a cyclic development, during which the role of their components for engineer and non-engineer species changes. Our study presents the first biogeomorphic model of TBL development and highlights the applicability and necessity of biogeomorphic approaches and research in periglacial environments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Biogeomorphology; Periglacial; Ecosystem engineering; Glacier foreland; Solifluction
Institutions of the University: Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Chemistry
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Geomorphology
Result of work at the UBT: No
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 550 Earth sciences, geology
Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2019 08:17
Last Modified: 08 Apr 2019 08:17
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/48591