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Relative Abundance of Thiolated Species of As, Mo, W, and Sb in Hot Springs of Yellowstone National Park and Iceland

Title data

Planer-Friedrich, Britta ; Forberg, Judith ; Lohmayer, Regina ; Kerl, Carolin F. ; Boeing, Friedrich ; Kaasalainen, Hanna ; Stefánsson, Andri:
Relative Abundance of Thiolated Species of As, Mo, W, and Sb in Hot Springs of Yellowstone National Park and Iceland.
In: Environmental Science & Technology. Vol. 54 (March 2020) Issue 7 . - pp. 4295-4304.
ISSN 0013-936X
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.0c00668

Abstract in another language

Geothermal waters often are enriched in trace metal(loid)s, like arsenic, antimony, molybdenum, and tungsten. Presence of sulfide can lead to formation of thiolated anions, however, their contributions to total element concentrations typically remain unknown because non-suitable sample stabilization and chromatographic separation methods convert them to oxyanions. Here, the concurrent widespread occurrence of thioarsenates, thiomolybdates, thiotungstates, and thioantimonates, in sulfide-rich hot springs from Yellowstone National Park and Iceland is shown. More thiolation was generally observed at higher molar sulfide to metal(loid) excess (Iceland>Yellowstone). Thioarsenates were the most prominent and ubiquitous thiolated species, with trithioarsenate typically dominating arsenic speciation. In some Icelandic hot springs, arsenic was nearly quantitatively thiolated. Also for molybdenum, thioanions dominated over oxyanions in many Icelandic hot springs. For tungsten and antimony, oxyanions typically dominated and thioanions were observed less frequently, but still contributed up to a few tens of percent in some springs. This order of relative abundance (thioarsenates>thiomolybdates>thiotungstates≈thioantimonates) was also observed when looking at processes triggering transformation of thioanions like mixing with non-geothermal waters or H2S-degassing and oxidation with increasing distance from a discharge. Even though to different extents, thiolation contributed substantially to speciation of all four elements studied, indicating their analysis is required when studying geothermal systems.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Environmental Geochemistry Group
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Environmental Geochemistry Group > Professor Environmental Geochemistry - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Britta Planer-Friedrich
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 500 Natural sciences
500 Science > 550 Earth sciences, geology
Date Deposited: 28 May 2020 07:01
Last Modified: 28 May 2020 07:01
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/55294