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Rapid glucose rise reduces heart rate variability in adults with type 1 diabetes : a prospective secondary outcome analysis

Title data

Eckstein, Max L. ; Moser, Othmar ; Tripolt, Norbert J. ; Pferschy, Peter N. ; Obermayer, Anna A. M. ; Kojzar, Harald ; Müller, Alexander ; Abbas, Farah ; Sourij, Caren ; Sourij, Harald:
Rapid glucose rise reduces heart rate variability in adults with type 1 diabetes : a prospective secondary outcome analysis.
In: Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. (December 2020) .
ISSN 1462-8902
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/dom.14287

Abstract in another language

Objective: To investigate differences in heart rate variability (HRV) during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) in response to the rate of change in glucose and different glycemic ranges in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Methods: This was a single-center, prospective, secondary outcome analysis in 17 individuals with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c 7.0 ± 0.6%) who underwent two OGTTs (after 12 and 36 hours of fasting) investigating differences in HRV in response to rapid glucose excursions and different glycemic ranges and during OGTT. Results: Based on the rate of change in glucose, heart rate (p<0.001), RMSSD (p=0.002), pNN50% (p<0.001) and QTc (p=0.04) were significantly altered, with particularly reduced HRV during episodes of rapid glucose rises. Glycemic ranges during OGTT had no impact on HRV (p<0.05). Conclusions: Individuals with type 1 diabetes showed no changes in HRV to different glycemic ranges. HRV was depending on the rate of change in glucose, especially to rapid increases in glucose. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: type 1 diabetes; heart rate variability; autonomic regulation; oral glucose tolerance test
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Cultural Studies > Department of Sport Science > Chair Exercise Physiology > Chair Exercise Physiology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Othmar Moser
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 600 Technology, medicine, applied sciences > 610 Medicine and health
Date Deposited: 11 May 2021 07:20
Last Modified: 11 May 2021 07:21
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/65128