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Microbial communities in paddy soils : differences in abundance and functionality between rhizosphere and pore water, the influence of different soil organic carbon, sulfate fertilization and cultivation time, and contribution to arsenic mobility and speciation

Title data

Zecchin, Sarah ; Wang, Jiajia ; Martin, Maria ; Romani, Marco ; Planer-Friedrich, Britta ; Cavalca, Lucia:
Microbial communities in paddy soils : differences in abundance and functionality between rhizosphere and pore water, the influence of different soil organic carbon, sulfate fertilization and cultivation time, and contribution to arsenic mobility and speciation.
In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology. Vol. 99 (2023) Issue 11 . - fiad121.
ISSN 1574-6941
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fiad121

Abstract in another language

Abiotic factors and rhizosphere microbial populations influence arsenic accumulation in rice grains. Although mineral and organic surfaces are keystones in element cycling, localization of specific microbial reactions in the root/soil/pore water system is still unclear. Here, we tested if original unplanted soil, rhizosphere soil and pore water represented distinct ecological microniches for arsenic-, sulfur- and iron-cycling microorganisms and compared the influence of relevant factors such as soil type, sulfate fertilization and cultivation time. In rice open-air-mesocosms with two paddy soils (2.0% and 4.7% organic carbon), Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing demonstrated minor effects of cultivation time and sulfate fertilization that decreased Archaea-driven microbial networks and incremented sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Different compartments, characterized by different bacterial and archaeal compositions, had the strongest effect, with higher microbial abundances, bacterial biodiversity and interconnections in the rhizosphere vs pore water. Within each compartment, a significant soil type effect was observed. Higher percentage contributions of rhizosphere dissimilatory arsenate- and iron-reducing, arsenite-oxidizing, and, surprisingly, dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacteria, as well as pore water iron-oxidizing bacteria in the lower organic carbon soil, supported previous chemistry-based interpretations of a more active S-cycling, a higher percentage of thioarsenates and lower arsenic mobility by sorption to mixed Fe(II)Fe(III)-minerals in this soil.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Environmental Geochemistry Group > Professor Environmental Geochemistry - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Britta Planer-Friedrich
Research Institutions > Central research institutes > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Result of work at the UBT: No
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
500 Science > 550 Earth sciences, geology
Date Deposited: 07 Nov 2023 06:46
Last Modified: 07 Nov 2023 06:46
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/87486