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Bites, Blood, Boundaries: Rats, Mosquitoes, and Domestication across Disciplines

Title data

Reis-Castro, Luísa ; Lee, Jia Hui:
Bites, Blood, Boundaries: Rats, Mosquitoes, and Domestication across Disciplines.
In: The Journal of Interdisciplinary History. Vol. 54 (2024) Issue 3 . - pp. 351-370.
ISSN 1530-9169
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1162/jinh_a_02002

Project information

Project financing: Wenner-Gren Foundation

Abstract in another language

Domestication is a set of processes that requires active reconfigurations of interspecies relations, environments, and technologies. In this view, both ethnographic and historical sources help us track the exact ways that domestication as a practice actively reveals and conceals relations of power among people and between people and other animals. Two pertinent cases—training rats in Tanzania to detect landmines and releasing mosquitoes to deter the transmission of pathogenic viruses in Brazil—take place in contexts where animals are being modified to achieve certain developmental, medical, or humanitarian goals. These animals, like any in the history of domestication, breach boundaries, crossing wild and domestic categories, in these cases at the moment and experience of being bitten. These moments draw our attention to the stakes involved in thinking about domestication.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Cultural Studies > Junior Professor Science and Technology Studies of the Global South > Junior Professor Science and Technology Studies of the Global South - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jia Hui Lee
Result of work at the UBT: No
DDC Subjects: 300 Social sciences > 300 Social sciences, sociology and anthropology
900 History and geography > 900 History
Date Deposited: 28 Jun 2024 05:34
Last Modified: 28 Jun 2024 05:34
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/89859