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Invasibility of grassland and heath communities exposed to extreme weather events : additive effects of biotic resistance and fluctuating physical environment

Title data

Kreyling, Jürgen ; Beierkuhnlein, Carl ; Ellis, Laura ; Jentsch, Anke:
Invasibility of grassland and heath communities exposed to extreme weather events : additive effects of biotic resistance and fluctuating physical environment.
In: Oikos. Vol. 117 (2008) Issue 10 . - pp. 1542-1554.
ISSN 1600-0706
DOI: 10.1111/j.0030-1299.2008.16653.x

Abstract in another language

Understanding the resistance of plant communities to invasion is urgent in times of changes in the physical environmentdue to climate change and changes in the resident communities due to biodiversity loss. Here, we test the interaction between repeated drought or heavy rainfall events and functional diversity of grassland and heath communities on invasibility, measured as the number of plant individuals invading from the matrix vegetation. Invasibility of experimental plant communities was influenced by extreme weather events, although no change in above-ground productivity of the resident communities was observed. Drought decreased invasibility while heavy rainfall increased invasibility, a pattern that is consistent with the fluctuating resource hypothesis. Higher community diversity generally decreased invasibility, which can be explained by a combination of the fluctuating resource hypothesis and niche theory. The effects of the physical environment (extreme weather events) and diversity resistance (community composition) were additive, as they were independent from each other. Differences in the composition of invading species sets were found, and Indicator Species Analysis revealed several invading species with significant affinity to one particular extreme weatherevent or community composition. This finding supports niche theory and contradicts neutral species assembly. Our data supports theories which predict decreased resistance of plant communities due to both increased climate variability and biodiversity loss. The effects of these two factors, however, appear to be independent from each other.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER55464
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Biogeography
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Biogeography > Chair Biogeography - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Carl Beierkuhnlein
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professorship Disturbance Ecology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professorship Disturbance Ecology > Professorship Disturbance Ecology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Anke Jentsch
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 05 Jun 2015 06:19
Last Modified: 05 Jun 2015 06:19
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/14757