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Soil biotic processes remain surprisingly stable in face of 100-year extreme weather events in experimental grassland and heath

Title data

Kreyling, Jürgen ; Beierkuhnlein, Carl ; Elmer, Michael ; Pritsch, Karin ; Radovski, Monica ; Schloter, Michael ; Wöllecke, Jens ; Jentsch, Anke:
Soil biotic processes remain surprisingly stable in face of 100-year extreme weather events in experimental grassland and heath.
In: Plant and Soil. Vol. 308 (2008) Issue 1-2 . - pp. 175-188.
ISSN 1573-5036
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-008-9617-1

Abstract in another language

Climate change will increase the recurrence of extreme weather events such as drought and heavy rainfall. Evidence suggests that extreme weather events pose threats to ecosystem functioning, particularly to nutrient cycling and biomass production. These ecosystem functions depend strongly on belowground biotic processes, including the activity and interactions among plants, soil fauna, and microorganisms. Here, experimental grassland and heath communities of three phytodiversity levels were exposed either to a simulated single drought or to a heavy rainfall event. Both weather manipulations were repeated for two consecutive years. The magnitude of manipulations imitated the local 100-year extreme weather event. Heavy rainfall events increased below-ground plant biomass and stimulated soil enzyme activities as well as decomposition rates for both plant communities. In contrast, extreme drought did not reduce below-ground plant biomass and root length, soil enzyme activities, and cellulose decomposition rate. The low responsiveness of the measured ecosystem properties in face of the applied weather manipulations rendered the detection of significant interactions between weather events and phytodiversity impossible. Our data indicate on the one hand the close interaction between below ground plant parameters and microbial turnover processes in soil; on the other hand it shows that the plant–soil system can buffer against extreme drought events, at last for the period of investigation.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER53732
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Biogeography
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Biogeography > Chair Biogeography - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Carl Beierkuhnlein
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professorship Disturbance Ecology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professorship Disturbance Ecology > Professorship Disturbance Ecology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Anke Jentsch
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 05 Jun 2015 06:19
Last Modified: 05 Jun 2015 06:19
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/14758