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Evidence for involvement of gut-associated denitrifying bacteria in emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) by earthworms obtained from garden and forest soils

Title data

Matthies, Carola ; Grießhammer, Anja ; Schmittroth, Martina ; Drake, Harold L.:
Evidence for involvement of gut-associated denitrifying bacteria in emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) by earthworms obtained from garden and forest soils.
In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Vol. 65 (1999) Issue 8 . - pp. 3599-3604.
ISSN 1098-5336

Abstract in another language

Earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus rubellus, Octolasion lacteum) obtained from nitrous oxide (N2O)-emitting garden soils 0.14 to 0.87 nmol of N2O h-1 g (fresh weight-1) under in vivo conditions . L. rubellus obtained from N2O-emitting forest soil also emitted N2O, which confirmed previous observations (G. R. Karsten and H. L. Drake, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:1878-1882, 1997). In contrast, commercially obtained Lumbricus terrestris did not emit N2O; however, such worms emitted N2O when they are fed (i.e., preincubated in) garden soils. A. caliginosa, L. rubellus, and O. lacteum substantially increased the rates of N2O emission of garden soil columns and microcosms. Extrapolation of the data to in situ conditions indicated that N2O emission by earthworms accounted for approximately 33% of the N2O emitted by garden soils. In vivo emission of N2O by earthworms obtained from both garden and forest soils was greatly stimulated when worms were moistened with sterile solutions of nitrate or nitrite; in contrast, ammonium did not stimulate in vivo emission of N2O. In the presence of nitrate, acetylene increased the N2O emission rates of earthworms; in contrast, in the presence of nitrite, acetylene had little or no effect on the emission of N2O. In vivo emission of N2O decreased by 80% when earthworms were preincubated in soil supplemented with streptomycin and tetracycline. On a fresh weight basis, the rates of N2O emission dissected earthworm gut sections were substantially higher than the rates of N2O emission of dissected worms lacking gut sections, indicating that N2O production occurred in the gut rather than on the worm surface. In contrast to living earthworms and gut sections that produced N2O under oxic conditions (i.e., in the presence of air), fresh casts (feces) from N2O-emitting earthworms produced N2O only under anoxic conditions. Collectively, these results indicate that gut-associated denitrifying bacteria are responsible for the in vivo emission of N2O by earthworms and contribute to the N2O that is emitted from certain terrestrial ecosystems.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER7316
Institutions of the University: Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Ecological Microbiology
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 30 Sep 2015 05:56
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2015 05:56
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/19935