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Effects of carbon, nitrogen, and electron acceptor availability on anaerobic N2-fixation in a beech forest soil

Title data

Limmer, Claudia ; Drake, Harold L.:
Effects of carbon, nitrogen, and electron acceptor availability on anaerobic N2-fixation in a beech forest soil.
In: Soil Biology & Biochemistry. Vol. 30 (1998) Issue 2 . - pp. 153-158.
ISSN 0038-0717
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0038-0717(97)00099-0

Abstract in another language

The effects of different energy sources and inhibitors on the nitrogenase activity of a beech forest soil of north-east Bavaria (Germany) was determined by use of the acetylene-reduction method. Sugars and carbohydrates greatly stimulated nitrogenase activity under anaerobic, but not under aerobic, conditions; of the substrates tested, cellobiose yielded the highest anaerobic activity. In contrast, organic acids had no appreciable stimulating effect. Glucose-stimulated anaerobic nitrogenase activity was linked to the formation of butyrate (implicating the involvement of clostridia) and to the apparent growth of anaerobic N2-fixing microorganisms. The N2-fixing microorganisms culturable under anaerobic conditions in unamended soil approximated 105 cells g-1 d. w. soil and increased three orders of magnitude after two days of anaerobic incubation with glucose. In contrast, no N2-fixing microorganisms were culturable under aerobic conditions. Inhibition of anaerobic nitrogenase activity by supplemental ammonium and nitrate occurred in both unamended and glucose-amended soils. Nitrate was sequentially transformed to N2O and N2, with minor amounts also being reduced to ammonium. Thus, nitrate appeared to have an indirect inhibitory effect on N2-fixation, the reduction of nitrate being more competitive for available reductant than N2-fixation. This competitive effect was not observed with sulfate. These results suggest that in situ N2-fixation in the forest soil examined may be regulated in part by the availability of specific reductant sources and the presence of the competing reductant sink nitrate.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER7098
Institutions of the University: Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Ecological Microbiology
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 30 Sep 2015 05:56
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2015 05:56
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/19966