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Anaerobic microflora of Everglades sediments : effects of nutrients on population profiles and activities

Title data

Drake, Harold L. ; Aumen, Nicholas G. ; Kuhner, Carla H. ; Wagner, Christine ; Grießhammer, Anja ; Schmittroth, Martina:
Anaerobic microflora of Everglades sediments : effects of nutrients on population profiles and activities.
In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Vol. 62 (1996) Issue 2 . - pp. 486-493.
ISSN 1098-5336

Abstract in another language

Everglades sediments (wetland soils) near sources of agricultural runoff had low redox potentials, were blackened with sulfide, and displayed high porewater phosphorus (total) concentrations and high water column conductivities. These sediments yielded 103-104-fold higher numbers of culturable anaerobes, including methanogens, sulfate reducers, and acetate producers, than did sediments from Everglades and Lake Okeechobee comparative control sites not as directly associated with agricultural runoff. These observations demonstrated that there was a general, rather than specific, enhancement of the anaerobic microflora in the sediments most likey influenced by agricultural runoff. Despite these differences in microfloral patterns, methylmercury and total mercury levels were similar among these contrasting sediments. Although available sulfate and phosphorus appeared to stimulate the productivity of sulfate reducers in Everglades sediments, the number of culturable sulfate reducers did not directly correspond to the concentration of sulfate and phosphorus in porewaters. Microcosms supplemented with sulfate, nitrate, and phosphate altered the initial capacities of sediment microflora to produce acetate and methane from endogenous matter. For sediments nearest sources of agricultural runoff, phosphorus temporarily enhanced acetate formation and initially suppressed methane production, sulfate enhanced acetate formation but did not significantly alter the production of methane, and nitrate totally suppressed the initial production of both methane and acetate. In regards to the latter, microbes capable of dissimilating nitrate to ammonium were present in greater culturable numbers than denitrifiers. In microcosms, acetate was a major source of methane, and supplemental hydrogen was directed towards the synthesis of acetate via CO2-dependent acetogenesis. These findings demonstrate that Everglades sediments nearest agricultural runoff have enhanced anaerobic microbial profiles, and that the anaerobic microflora are poised to respond rapidly to phosphate, sulfate, and nitrate input.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER6936
Institutions of the University: Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Ecological Microbiology
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 30 Sep 2015 05:56
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2015 05:56
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/19995