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Fungal guilds are evenly distributed along a vertical spruce forest soil profile while individual fungi show pronounced niche partitioning

Title data

Peršoh, Derek ; Stolle, Nancy ; Brachmann, Andreas ; Begerow, Dominik ; Rambold, Gerhard:
Fungal guilds are evenly distributed along a vertical spruce forest soil profile while individual fungi show pronounced niche partitioning.
In: Mycological Progress. Vol. 17 (2018) Issue 8 . - pp. 925-939.
ISSN 1861-8952
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11557-018-1405-6

Abstract in another language

Saprotrophic and ectomycorrhizal (EcM) forest fungi decompose organic matter andmobilize nutrients for host plants, respectively. Competition between the two guildsmay cause the so-called 'Gadgil effect', i.e. decreased litter decomposition ratesresulting in increased carbon storage in soil. The Gadgil effect was supposed to evenaffect global climate, highlighting the necessity to understand fungal distribution andinteractions in soil. Searching for evidence of competition between saprotrophic andmycorrhizal fungi, we analyzed the distribution of fungi along a well-stratified verticalspruce forest soil profile in two seasons, i.e. autumn and the following spring. Thedifferent soil strata (i.e. two mineral horizons and two organic layers) underneath thelitter layer were colonized by distinct fungal communities, which included roughlyconsistent proportions of all fungal guilds and phyla at each time. However, thecommunity composition changed quantitatively between the sampling dates. Along thevertical soil profile, it differed mostly between the organic layers and the mineral soil,which is supposed to be due to differences in the predominant energy sources (i.e.aboveground litter and rhizodeposition, respectively). Network analyses revealed co-occurrences (i.e. positive correlations of individual abundances) to outweigh mutualexclusions (i.e. negative correlations) between individual fungi in each soil stratum andseason. This also applied for interactions between saprotrophic and EcM fungi.Network analyses therefore provided no indications for a possible Gadgil effect.However, considering individual nutrient use efficiencies might refine insights fromnetwork analyses in future studies and facilitate linking community dynamics toecosystem processes.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER145988
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Professorship Mycology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Professorship Mycology > Professorship Mycology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Gerhard Rambold
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 04 Apr 2019 10:22
Last Modified: 04 Apr 2019 10:22
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/48236