Titlebar

Export bibliographic data
Literature by the same author
plus on the publication server
plus at Google Scholar

 

Access to a carcass, but not mating opportunities, influences paternal care in burying beetles

Title data

Luzar, Agnieszka B. ; Schweizer, Rebecca ; Sakaluk, Scott K. ; Steiger, Sandra:
Access to a carcass, but not mating opportunities, influences paternal care in burying beetles.
In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. Vol. 71 (2017) Issue 1 .
ISSN 1432-0762
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-016-2232-x

Abstract in another language

Selection should favor greater parental effort when the caring individual is more likely to be related to the offspring in its care. If certainty of paternity varies across broods, plasticity in the extent of paternal care may be advantageous, provided that cues of a male’s paternity are available. Consequently, to understand relationships between parentage and parental care, it is necessary to identify the proximate factors governing the decision of males to provide care. Here, we examined parental decision rules in burying beetles, Nicrophorus vespilloides, carrion breeders exhibiting elaborate biparental care. In this species, aggressive interactions that ensue upon the discovery of a carcass by more than one male usually result in a single dominant male that monopolizes access to the carcass and the resident female, relegating subordinates to sneak matings. In the current study, we removed the dominant male after the larvae had hatched and found that about half of the subordinates opted to care for the brood. The decision to provide care was affected by carcass size and the presence of the resident female during the post-hatching period. In a second experiment, we manipulated a subordinate’s access to the resident female and/or the carcass during the pre-hatching period. Surprisingly, we found that mating opportunities had no effect on the subordinate’s decision to provide care. Instead, it was the opportunity to access the carcass that triggered male parental behavior. Our results highlight the need for careful experimental manipulations to identify the cue(s) used by males to assess their certainty of paternity.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Additional notes: BAYCEER147323
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Animal Ecology II - Evolutionary Animal Ecology > Chair Animal Ecology II - Evolutionary Animal Ecology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Sandra Steiger
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Result of work at the UBT: No
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2019 12:37
Last Modified: 08 Apr 2019 12:37
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/48317