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Using Blinking Optical Tweezers to Study Cell Rheology During Initial Cell-Particle Contact

Title data

Berghoff, Konrad ; Gross, Wolfgang ; Eisentraut, Manuel ; Kress, Holger:
Using Blinking Optical Tweezers to Study Cell Rheology During Initial Cell-Particle Contact.
In: Biophysical Journal. (26 June 2021) .
ISSN 1542-0086
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bpj.2021.04.034

Project information

Project title:
Project's official titleProject's id
SFB 1357 MikroplastikSFB1357
KR 3524/4-1KR 3524/4-1

Project financing: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft
Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes
Elite Network of Bavaria

Abstract in another language

Phagocytosis is an important part of innate immunity and describes the engulfment of bacteria and other extracellular objects on the micrometer-scale. The protrusion of the cell membrane around the bacteria during this process is driven by a reorganization of the actin cortex. The process has been studied on the molecular level to great extent during the past decades. However, a deep, fundamental understanding of the mechanics of the process is still lacking, in particular due to a lack of techniques which give access to binding dynamics below the optical resolution limit and cellular viscoelasticity at the same time. In this work, we propose a technique to characterize the mechanical properties of cells in a highly localized manner and apply it to investigate the early stages of phagocytosis. The technique can simultaneously resolve the contact region between a cell and an external object (in our application a phagocytic target) even below the optical resolution limit. We used immunoglobulin-G (IgG)-coated microparticles with a size of 2 μm as a model system and attached the particles to the macrophages with holographic optical tweezers. By switching the trap on and off, we were able to measure the rheological properties of the cells in a time-resolved manner during the first few minutes after attachment. The measured viscoelastic cellular response is consistent with power law rheology. The contact radius between particle and cell increased on a timescale of about 30 s and converged after a few minutes. While the binding dynamics are not affected by cytochalasin D, we observed an increase of the cellular compliance and a significant fluidization of the cortex after addition of cytochalasin D treatment. Furthermore, we report upper boundaries for the length- and timescale, at which cortical actin has been hypothesized to depolymerize during early phagocytosis.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Institutions of the University: Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Mathematics, Physics und Computer Science
Faculties > Faculty of Mathematics, Physics und Computer Science > Department of Physics
Faculties > Faculty of Mathematics, Physics und Computer Science > Department of Physics > Professor Experimental Physics VI - Biologial Physics
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Polymer and Colloid Science
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Molecular Biosciences
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Nonlinear Dynamics
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Collaborative Research Centers, Research Unit
Research Institutions > Collaborative Research Centers, Research Unit > SFB 1357 - MIKROPLASTIK
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 500 Natural sciences
500 Science > 530 Physics
500 Science > 570 Life sciences, biology
Date Deposited: 06 Jul 2021 13:50
Last Modified: 15 Jul 2021 07:23
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/66462