Titlebar

Export bibliographic data
Literature by the same author
plus on the publication server
plus at Google Scholar

 

Investigation of gas sensing in large lithium-ion battery systems for early fault detection and safety improvement

Title data

Wenger, Martin M. ; Waller, R. ; Lorentz, Vincent ; März, M. ; Herold, M.:
Investigation of gas sensing in large lithium-ion battery systems for early fault detection and safety improvement.
2014
Event: IECON 2014 - 40th Annual Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society , Oct. 29–Nov. 1, 2014 , Dallas, TX, USA.
(Conference item: Conference , Speech with paper )
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1109/IECON.2014.7049366

Official URL: Volltext

Project information

Project title:
Project's official titleProject's id
ESTRELIA: Energy Storage with lowered cost and improved Safety and Reliability for electrical vehicles285739

Project financing: 7. Forschungsrahmenprogramm für Forschung, technologische Entwicklung und Demonstration der Europäischen Union
The research work leading to these results was conducted as part of the project ESTRELIA - “Energy Storage with lowered cost and improved Safety and Reliability for electrical vehicles”. This project has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 285739.

Abstract in another language

Large lithium-ion battery systems rely on battery monitoring and management systems to ensure safe and efficient operation. Typically the battery current, the cell voltages, and the cell temperatures are monitored. This paper describes the use of gas sensors in large lithium-ion battery systems in addition to conventionally used means of battery monitoring. An undetected electrolyte leak in a cell can pose a serious threat to users and maintenance personnel. Experiments described in this paper show that a gas sensor can easily detect volatile organic compounds (VOC) from the leaking electrolyte, whereas standard cell monitoring methods can only detect a leak indirectly over premature cell performance degradation. Therefore, gas sensors offer a fast, simple, and cost efficient way to increase the safety of battery systems. This paper gives a description of a suitable gas sensor and its application in a battery system, followed by the identification of relevant use cases. In the experimental section the performance of the gas sensor in these use cases is investigated and evaluated. The paper ends with a summary of the results and a short outlook.

Further data

Item Type: Conference item (Speech with paper)
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: lithium-ion battery; monitoring; BMS; gas sensor; electrolyte leak
Institutions of the University: Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayerisches Zentrum für Batterietechnik - BayBatt
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Result of work at the UBT: No
DDC Subjects: 600 Technology, medicine, applied sciences > 620 Engineering
Date Deposited: 07 Jun 2022 08:58
Last Modified: 12 Aug 2022 07:15
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/69873