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Linking changes in species composition and biomass in a globally distributed grassland experiment

Title data

Ladouceur, Emma ; Blowes, Shane A. ; Chase, Jonathan M. ; Clark, Adam T. ; Garbowski, Magda ; Alberti, Juan ; Arnillas, Carlos Alberto ; Bakker, Jonathan D. ; Barrio, Isabel C. ; Bharath, Siddharth ; Borer, Elizabeth T. ; Brudvig, Lars A. ; Cadotte, Marc W. ; Chen, Qingqing ; Collins, Scott L. ; Dickman, Christopher R. ; Donohue, Ian ; Du, Guozhen ; Ebeling, Anne ; Eisenhauer, Nico ; Fay, Philip A. ; Hagenah, Nicole ; Hautier, Yann ; Jentsch, Anke ; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg S. ; Komatsu, Kimberly ; MacDougall, Andrew ; Martina, Jason P. ; Moore, Joslin L. ; Morgan, John W. ; Peri, Pablo L. ; Power, Sally A. ; Ren, Zhengwei ; Risch, Anita C. ; Roscher, Christiane ; Schuchardt, Max A. ; Seabloom, Eric W. ; Stevens, Carly J. ; Veen, G.F. (Ciska) ; Virtanen, Risto ; Wardle, Glenda M. ; Wilfahrt, Peter A. ; Harpole, W. Stanley:
Linking changes in species composition and biomass in a globally distributed grassland experiment.
In: Ecology Letters. Vol. 25 (2022) Issue 12 . - pp. 2699-2712.
ISSN 1461-023X
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.14126

Abstract in another language

Global change drivers, such as anthropogenic nutrient inputs, are increasing globally. Nutrient deposition simultaneously alters plant biodiversity, species composition and ecosystem processes like aboveground biomass production. These changes are underpinned by species extinction, colonisation and shifting relative abundance. Here, we use the Price equation to quantify and link the contributions of species that are lost, gained or that persist to change in aboveground biomass in 59 experimental grassland sites. Under ambient (control) conditions, compositional and biomass turnover was high, and losses (i.e. local extinctions) were balanced by gains (i.e. colonisation). Under fertilisation, the decline in species richness resulted from increased species loss and decreases in species gained. Biomass increase under fertilisation resulted mostly from species that persist and to a lesser extent from species gained. Drivers of ecological change can interact relatively independently with diversity, composition and ecosystem processes and functions such as aboveground biomass due to the individual contributions of species lost, gained or persisting.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Biogeography
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Biogeography > Chair Biogeography - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Carl Beierkuhnlein
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Disturbance Ecology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Disturbance Ecology > Professor Disturbance Ecology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Anke Jentsch
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Graduate Schools > Elite Network Bavaria
Graduate Schools > Elite Network Bavaria > Global Change Ecology
Faculties
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Graduate Schools
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 550 Earth sciences, geology
500 Science > 570 Life sciences, biology
500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)
Date Deposited: 29 Nov 2022 07:13
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2022 07:13
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/72927