Literature by the same author
plus at Google Scholar

Bibliografische Daten exportieren
 

Disentangling natural and anthropogenic drivers of native and non‐native plant diversity on North Sea islands

Title data

Walentowitz, Anna J. ; Ferreira‐Arruda, Thalita ; Irl, Severin D. H. ; Kreft, Holger ; Beierkuhnlein, Carl:
Disentangling natural and anthropogenic drivers of native and non‐native plant diversity on North Sea islands.
In: Journal of Biogeography. (2023) .
ISSN 0305-0270
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.14753

Abstract in another language

Aim: Biodiversity on islands is commonly explained by a set of natural drivers such as area, isolation and habitat heterogeneity. However, constant human impact has led to considerable changes in island floras worldwide. This is reflected, among others, in increased numbers of non-native species. Barrier islands are discrete land units, strongly influenced by humans and not displaying significant evolutionary dynamics. This makes them highly suitable for studying contemporary patterns of species richness and underlying processes. We aim to disentangle the effects of established natural and anthropogenic drivers on native and non-native plant species richness at the example of 31 European barrier islands.
Location: 31 North Sea barrier islands located off the Dutch, German and Danish coast.
Taxon: Native and non-native plant species (spermatophytes and ferns).
Methods: Individual relationships of natural and anthropogenic drivers with native and non-native plant species richness are analysed with generalised linear models (GLMs). We use structural equation models (SEMs) to additionally account for interrelations between drivers.
Results: Island area was the strongest predictor of native and non-native plant species richness but affected richness mostly indirectly through habitat heterogeneity (non-native species) and island inhabitants (native species). Isolation had a slight negative effect on native and non-native plant species numbers on islands.
Main Conclusions: The richness of native and non-native plant species on islands is associated with different drivers, that is, habitat heterogeneity and island inhabitants respectively. This might be caused by distinct underlying processes forming native and non-native richness patterns. Area was confirmed to be the most important driver of species richness but acting primarily through other natural and anthropogenic drivers of plant species richness. We encourage considering both natural and anthropogenic drivers and their interrelatedness to explain contemporary biogeographic patterns of species richness.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: alien species; barrier islands; biodiversity; habitat heterogeneity; island biogeography; isolation; nature conservation; SAR; structural-equation model; Wadden Sea
Institutions of the University: Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Biogeography
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Biogeography > Chair Biogeography - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Carl Beierkuhnlein
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Central research institutes
Research Institutions > Central research institutes > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Graduate Schools
Graduate Schools > Elite Network Bavaria
Graduate Schools > Elite Network Bavaria > Global Change Ecology
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 550 Earth sciences, geology
500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)
Date Deposited: 12 Dec 2023 08:34
Last Modified: 12 Dec 2023 08:34
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/88035