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Unraveling root and rhizosphere traits in temperate maize landraces and modern cultivars : Implications for soil resource acquisition and drought adaptation

Title data

Wild, Andreas J. ; Steiner, Franziska A. ; Kiene, Marvin ; Tyborski, Nicolas ; Tung, Shu‐Yin ; Köhler, Tina ; Carminati, Andrea ; Eder, Barbara ; Groth, Jennifer ; Vahl, Wouter K. ; Wolfrum, Sebastian ; Lüders, Tillmann ; Laforsch, Christian ; Mueller, Carsten W. ; Vidal, Alix ; Pausch, Johanna:
Unraveling root and rhizosphere traits in temperate maize landraces and modern cultivars : Implications for soil resource acquisition and drought adaptation.
In: Plant, Cell & Environment. (2024) .
ISSN 1365-3040
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/pce.14898

Abstract in another language

A holistic understanding of plant strategies to acquire soil resources is pivotal in achieving sustainable food security. However, we lack knowledge about variety-specific root and rhizosphere traits for resource acquisition, their plasticity and adaptation to drought. We conducted a greenhouse experiment to phenotype root and rhizosphere traits (mean root diameter [Root D], specific root length [SRL], root tissue density, root nitrogen content, specific rhizosheath mass [SRM], arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi [AMF] colonization) of 16 landraces and 22 modern cultivars of temperate maize (Zea mays L.). Our results demonstrate that landraces and modern cultivars diverge in their root and rhizosphere traits. Although landraces follow a ‘do-it-yourself’ strategy with high SRLs, modern cultivars exhibit an ‘outsourcing’ strategy with increased mean Root Ds and a tendency towards increased root colonization by AMF. We further identified that SRM indicates an ‘outsourcing’ strategy. Additionally, landraces were more drought-responsive compared to modern cultivars based on multitrait response indices. We suggest that breeding leads to distinct resource acquisition strategies between temperate maize varieties. Future breeding efforts should increasingly target root and rhizosphere economics, with SRM serving as a valuable proxy for identifying varieties employing an outsourcing resource acquisition strategy.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Animal Ecology I > Chair Animal Ecology I - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Christian Laforsch
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Ecological Microbiology > Chair Ecological Microbiology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Tillmann Lüders
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Agroecology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Agroecology > Professor Agroecology - Juniorprof. Dr. Johanna Pausch
Research Institutions > Central research institutes > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Animal Ecology I
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Ecological Microbiology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Central research institutes
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
500 Science > 550 Earth sciences, geology
Date Deposited: 09 Apr 2024 06:34
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2024 07:40
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/89172