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Cell Retention by Encapsulation for the Cultivation of Jurkat Cells in Fixed and Fluidized Bed Reactors

Title data

Kaiser, Patrick ; Werner, Melanie ; Jérôme, Valérie ; Hübner, Holger ; Buchholz, Rainer ; Freitag, Ruth:
Cell Retention by Encapsulation for the Cultivation of Jurkat Cells in Fixed and Fluidized Bed Reactors.
In: Biotechnology and Bioengineering. Vol. 111 (December 2014) Issue 12 . - pp. 2571-2579.
ISSN 0006-3592
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/bit.25304

Official URL: Volltext

Project information

Project title:
Project's official titleProject's id
No informationBU 461/26-1; RF 830/14-1

Project financing: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Abstract in another language

Jurkat cells are accepted model cells for primary human T lymphocytes, e.g. in medical research. Their growth to tissue-like cell densities (up to 100 x 106 cells/mLcapsule) in semi-permeable (molecular weight cut off < 10’000 Da) sodium cellulose sulfate / poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) polyelectrolyte capsules has previously been shown by us (Werner et al. 2013). Herein, we demonstrate that encapsulation can be used to retain the cells in continuously operated bioreactors, which opens new possibilities for research, e.g. the use of Jurkat cells in pulse response experiments under steady state conditions. Two reactor concepts are presented, a fluidized and a fixed bed reactor.
A direct comparison of the growth kinetics in batch and repeated batch spinner cultivations, i.e. under conditions where both encapsulated and non-encapsulated cells can be cultivated under otherwise identical conditions, showed that maximum specific growth rates were higher for the encapsulated than for the non-encapsulated cells. In the subsequent batch and repeated batch bioreactor experiments (only encapsulated cells), growth rates were similar, with the exception of the fixed bed batch reactor, where growth kinetics were significantly slower. Concomitantly, a significant fraction of the cells towards the bottom of the bed were no longer metabolically active, though apparently not dead. In the repeated batch fluidized bed reactor cellular division could be maintained for more than two weeks, albeit with a specific growth rate below the maximum one, leading to final cell densities of approximately 180 x 106 cell/gcapsule. At the same time, the cell cycle distribution of the cells was shifted to the S and G2/M phases.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Jurkat cells; polyelectrolyte capsule; NaCS/PDADMAC; fixed bed reactor; fluidized bed reactor; cell retention
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science > Chair Process Biotechnology > Chair Process Biotechnology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Ruth Freitag
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center for Molecular Biosciences - BZMB
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Graduate Schools > Bayreuth Graduate School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences (BayNAT) > Molecular Biosciences
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science > Chair Process Biotechnology
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Graduate Schools
Graduate Schools > Bayreuth Graduate School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences (BayNAT)
Result of work at the UBT: Yes
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
500 Science > 570 Life sciences, biology
600 Technology, medicine, applied sciences
600 Technology, medicine, applied sciences > 620 Engineering
Date Deposited: 18 Dec 2014 08:23
Last Modified: 18 Dec 2014 08:23
URI: https://eref.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/5097